closeup: 'Sterling Flurry'  TB,  Sterling Innerst 1992

 

'Rumbleseat' TB, Sterling Innerst 1991

 

'Sterling Flurry' TB, Innerst 1992

 

'Bronzette Star' TB, Evelyn Kegerise 1992

 

Iris florentina, species from Pennsbury Manor, Morrisville PA

'Night Magic' TB, Eleanor Kegerise 1991

 

'Borderline' BB, Joseph Ghio 1984

'Justa Wish' MTB, Richard Morgan 1998

 

closeup: 'Rare Edition' IB, Joseph Gatty 1980

 

 

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Welcome to DVIS!

 

DVIS OPEN GARDENS

(Please contact the owner before visiting a PRIVATE HOME garden)

 

Thanks to all those who have opened their gardens to our members. This year there are 12 gardens in the DVIS Open Garden Program.  Our hosts invite you to visit their gardens. They are very proud of their gardens and want you to see the product of all their hard work.  They would be very disappointed if you didn't visit.

Some gardens are large and some are smaller, but all have a lot to offer the visitor. It is a wonderful opportunity to see different and newer varieties of irises, to witness how they are grown, and to get acquainted with other iris enthusiasts.  This year, eight of the gardens are also enrolled in the First- Year Introduction Program. This is a chance to see some of the very newest varieties by notable hybridizers. And it is an excellent opportunity to make out your wish list for those that will be distributed later this year. 

All the open gardens are listed below. Please call or email the host before you visit. The host can help you with directions. And, for your convenience, the irises will have name tags.

Jen Cunningham, open garden chair, has put together self-guided tours for the open gardens. For a copy, contact Jen: Jen@dvis-ais.org or (610) 767-2712. If you are interested in adding your garden to the open garden list for next year, fill out the attached form and mail it back to Jen.  Please resolve to be a visitor in this the year of our golden anniversary.

Carol Ann Moyer Iris Garden
Carol Ann Moyer Iris Garden 2009, an example of the many beautiful open gardens

List of DVIS Open Gardens

All DVIS and AIS members are invited and encouraged to visit member gardens enrolled in the DVIS Open Garden Program. Please contact the garden host before you visit. The host can help you with directions. After each name listed, address and contact information is provided. Additional useful information regarding the garden is also included. All gardens identify their irises with name tags for the convenience of visitors.  Hosts for the DVIS First-Year Introduction Program are indicated by an asterisk (*).

  

*George and Carol Boyce
Glenara Gardens

520 Dairy Road
Palmerton, PA 18071-5923
(610) 824-8198  www.glenara.net

A commercial garden with large collection of irises and many other plants. Includes Schreinerís Iris Display beds and a Dykes Medal Winnerís bed.

 

*Brett Butler

733 Olive St.

Florence , NJ 08518

(609) 499-3484

An up and coming hybridizer. Host for 2011 Black and T. Johnson introductions.

 

*Jen and Matt Cunningham

4245 Lovers Lane

Slatington , PA 18080

(610) 767-2712 Jen@dvis-ais.org

An excellent new large commercial garden with many TBs, but also a good representation of most other types.  Host for 2010 Sutton introductions. Also host for 2012 Keppel introductions.

 

*Doreen Duncan

12 Spruce Lane

Boyertown, PA 19512

Beautifully landscaped large garden with many plant varieties. Very scenic. Host for 2012 International Iris introductions.

 

Bob Gutowski

Garden located at 305 E. Northwestern Ave. , Philadelphia , PA 19118

(215) 247-5777 x132 Bob@dvis-ais.org

A charming cottage garden with 23 iris species; also TBs, medians, historic diploids, beardless. Bloom 4/15-6/15.

 

Harold Griffie

Garden located at 447 Carlisle Rd. (Rt.

34), Biglerville , PA (1 mi north of town square)

(717) 677-7818 Harold@dvis-ais.org

A must-see large garden with outstanding TBs, beardless and species.

 

*Greg Hodgkinson

1145 Krentler
Hanover, PA 17331

Gregory.S.Hodgkinson@nasa.gov

Home of the Sterling Project. Host for 2011 Ghio introductions.

 

Bobbe Horvath
950 N. Manor Rd.
Honey Brook, PA 19344
(610) 942-8844

An informal country garden with many iris types.  A must see.

 

Jason and Pat Leader

9328 Forest Rd.

Glen Rock, PA 17327-9802

(717) 428-2068 jaleader@aol.com

All types of irises in a garden, specializing in medians. Noted for an extensive MTB collection.

 

Goodstay Gardens

2600 Pennsylvania Ave.

Wilmington, DE 19938

Public garden of U. of Delaware. No need to call – open during daylight hours. Iris collection maintained by Frank Sawyer and Vince Lewonski.

 

Carol Ann and James Moyer

Delaware Valley College

Rt. US 202

Doylestown , PA 18901

(Use parking lot off of New Britain Rd.)

(215) 794-7257 Carol@dvis-ais.org

Carol Ann is volunteer in charge of the iris garden at DVC.  New gorgeous 80-ft iris garden in 3 large concentric circles for a fantastic display of most iris types. 

 

Vince Lewonski

509 South Bishop Ave.

Secane , PA 19018-2903

(856) 829-1880 (day) vp@dvis-ais.org

Many well-grown irises, with excellent selection of all types.  The garden demonstrates a remarkable use of space.

 

*Anne McNelis
16 Buckwater Road
Audubon, PA, PA 17584
Attractive garden with a nice iris collection and an extensive display of daylilies. Host for 2012 Kerr and Stanton introductions.

 

Daphne Sawyer

357 Brookwood Dr .

Downingtown , PA 19335

(610) 518-5665 Daphne@dvis-ais.org

In an idyllic suburban surrounding, a wonderful selection of mainly beardless which peak the first half of June. Good example of landscaping with irises.

 

*Gary Slagle

59 5. Market 51.

Gibbstown , NJ 08027

(856) 423-4477 Gary@dvis-ais.org

An outstanding large garden with most iris types. (Please do not pick or dead head. Wear garden shoes.)

Host for 2010 Keppel introductions and 2010 introductions received with DVIS auction orders.

 

*Ron Thoman

1010 Wiggins Way

West Chester , PA 19380-3312

(610) 719-6081 Ron@dvis-ais.org

Mostly newer TBs in a suburban garden. Host for 2010 Ghio introductions.

 

Joan Wood

184 Hopewell Dr.

Clayton , DE 19938

(302) 284-4236 or (302) 659-3044

Supurb large garden with all types of iris, including a large number of rebloomers.

 

Larry Westfall

1655 Hollow Rd.
Birchrunville, PA 19421-0243
(610) 827-1123 lwestbirch@verizon.net
A fantastic display of Japanese irises in a storybook setting. Peak bloom 6/23 to 7/3.

 


HOW TO BE A COURTEOUS VISITOR
Garden Etiquette

With bloom season fast approaching, I thought it appropriate to have some reminders on how to act while in someone's garden.

Private gardens are best seen by appointment. It is best to call ahead. Please phone in advance for directions and to set a mutually acceptable time for viewing the garden. Arrive promptly for your garden tour. Remember that Mother Nature does not always agree with our plans - or our anticipated bloom times! Remember that you are there to see the garden, so you may not be given a "house tour". While your host may offer you food and drink, you shouldn't expect it.

Wear sensible shoes, and expect to get them dirty. A hat or sunscreen should be brought along to protect you from the sun's rays. You are bound to see something you like, so bring a notepad and pen for future reference.

Please do not touch or pick the flowers! Some gardeners are iris hybridizers. They need the blooms for this purpose and you could upset their hybridizing efforts by touching tags or picking flowers that they need to make crosses. They may have already made a cross and are waiting for the seed pod to ripen. This is why it is very important not to "help" by doing any deadheading in the garden.

Don't move any plant markers. If you question the accuracy of one, share your concern with your host, rather than trying to guess where it should go.

Be careful with your umbrella, handbag, and camera. Also take care not to disturb any tags while walking through the garden. Most gardeners have a tendency to plant too close, so watch your feet! And always stay on the provided walking paths. The most common cause of broken stalks seems to be people trying to climb over a row as a shortcut.

P-l-e-a-s-e - NO uncontrollable pets or children! Many gardens have rare or valuable plants that could be damaged.

Do not ask for (or take!) plants or seeds.

Lastly, and most importantly... Please remember that you are a guest. These gardeners are extending themselves and their gardens for your benefit. They do this freely on a volunteer basis. Have Fun! Ask questions! But please...leave the garden as you found it! (Unless you want to do a bit of weeding... ;=)

Vince Lewonski